Blindness In Cats – Five Common Causes Of Feline Blindness

Cats naturally have superior vision. However, there are various conditions that can cause blindness in cats. Some of these conditions include hypertension, glaucoma, and cancer. Let’s take a look at some of these causes of feline blindness.

Hypertension

Hypertension, or high blood pressure, is one of the leading causes of blindness in cats. If left untreated, the pressure can cause the retina to rupture. This can occur in just a matter of days. Cats that have kidney disease, diabetes, or hyperthyroidism have the highest risk of developing hypertension.

An early sign that your cat is suffering from high blood pressure is the presence of dilated pupils. The pupils won’t respond to a change in light, and there also may be blood in your cat’s eye. Hypertension is dealt with by treating the underlying cause. Your cat may also need to start eating foods low in sodium.

Glaucoma

One of the next common causes of feline blindness is glaucoma. Glaucoma is a condition in which there is too much pressure within the eye. It is also a common problem for humans. If your cat is diagnosed in the early stages, the pressure may be reduced via medications. If it has already progressed, your cat may need surgery to correct the problem.

Cancer

Another cause of blindness in cats is cancer. Tumors can grow in or around the eye. In most cases, the eye will need to be surgically removed. However, it is usually replaced with a prosthetic eye to give a more natural look.

Atrophy

Progressive retinal atrophy is an untreatable condition that leads to feline blindness. Most cats suffer from this condition because they inherited it. The disease progresses slowly over time, but will lead to total blindness.

Kidney Disease

One of the final common causes is kidney disease. It is common for older cats to suffer problems like chronic renal failure as they age. Unfortunately, chronic renal failure leads to hypertension. As stated earlier, hypertension can easily cause sudden blindness in cats if the retina ruptures.

Lexus Intelligent Park Assist Tackles Parallel Parking

Everyone asks the same question. Will it find a parking space for me? Alas, no, but the Lexus Intelligent Park Assist, first made available on the 2007 Lexus LX 460 is still a significant advance in intuitive automotive technology. The system, which is optional, adds $3,425 to the base price of the $69,150 luxury sedan.

The Toyota Motor Corporation began to develop the system in 2004 and made it available in 2005 in Japan only on the Prius. Cars equipped with the Intelligent Park Assist are fitted with a camera to the rear of the vehicle, a computer, and a steering sensor.

When the driver pulls up to a spot for parallel parking, the vehicle is placed in reverse and the Intelligent Park Assist is activated. The camera places a live image of the parking area on the navigation screen in the center of the console. The image is overlaid with a box and four arrows. Using the arrows, the driver moves the box into the available space by tapping the screen.

Once the placement process is complete, the driver touches an activation button on the screen and releases the wheel while keeping his foot on the brake. The car will not stop for pedestrians or objects that may be in its path, so the driver must monitor the maneuver. If the driver takes his foot off the brake, the car immediately stops.

Additionally, the correct level of speed must be maintained. If the car is moving too slowly or too quickly, parking will also be halted. Once the vehicle has worked itself into the space, the car must be manually placed in drive and pulled forward to complete the positioning.

The Intelligent Park Assist system is not good for tight parking spaces. The area used must be four feet longer than the car itself. That translates to 20.5 feet for the LS 460 and 20.9 feet for the LS 460 L (which has a longer wheelbase.)

The camera can also be used for backing the car into a parking space, with the driver only being required to position the vehicle in front of the area so that the camera may image the space. The same guiding principles then apply.

Some reviewers who have tested the system complain that the learning curve is sufficiently tricky and long that simply parking the car the old-fashioned way is infinitely easier. Obviously drivers new to the Intelligent Park Assist need to practice with the technology before using it in real-life parking situations.

Still, however, with the increased use of cameras in automobiles and with Honda already selling a competing Smart Parking Assist System in Japan, this kind of intuitive technology will become more common in the cars of the future on models more drivers can afford. Designers will continue to refine the execution of the technology, making our vehicles smarter and safer in the process.

The Top 10 Most Famous Cats (part 4) Names Beginning With Se To Z

I’ve been compiling a list of famous cats for my Pet Numerology website for some time now. I know which my favorites are, but I wondered which are the most famous overall. There are so many great famous cats that I’m doing this in four groups, and then I’ll do a final round with the top cats from those groups.

The most famous cats (based on online chatter) with names starting with the letter Se to Z are:

10. Willie, who was George Burns’ cat

9. Skylar, from PC Cast and Kristin Cast’s “House of Night” novels

8. Si, from the Disney animated movie “Lady and the Tramp”

7. Toonces (the Driving Cat), from Saturday Night Live

6. Yum Yum, from Lilian Jackson Braun’s “The Cat Who…” mystery novel series

5. Spot, Data’s cat on Star Trek the Next Generation

4. Socks, the Clinton family cat during the Presidency of Bill Clinton

3. Tigger from A. A. Milne’s Winnie The Pooh

2. Sylvester from the classic Looney Tunes cartoons

…and the most famous cat on this list is…

1. Snowball, the Simpsons family cat from the animated series the Simpsons

Cats not ranking in the top 10 were Tonto from the movie Harry and Tonto, Sebastian from the animated series Josie and the Pussycats, Tabby who was Abraham Lincoln’s cat, Sid from the Ziggy comic strip, Willamena who was Charles Dickens’ cat, Sybil and Wilberforce who were both British Chief Mousers, and Tiddles who famously lived in London’s Paddington Station.

So a nice mix of cats from television (Snowball, Toonces, Spot) books (Tigger, Yum Yum, Skylar), animation (Snowball, Sylvester, Si), and even real life (Socks and Willie). This may be the first time two real life cats made it into the top 10, as cats who are famous for who they live with don’t usually score as well as cats famous for being beloved characters.

I compiled this list by searching for the names listed on a number of search engines and ranking them by the number of web pages, discussion forums, photos, videos, etc that are available online.

Cats And Hairballs – Cat Info

One may often encounter hairball problems with cats. Undigested hair that builds up inside a cats body are called “cat hairballs”. There are only 2 ways for a cat to get rid of the hair caught inside – with the aid of the digestive system or coughing it out. Since cats have rough tongues which they use vigorously to clean their fur, their stomach collects dead hair in large quantities. It is common for hair to be processed through their digestive system and find its way out with other materials that “flows down the drain”. From time to time too much hair will pile up inside the body, blocking the paths in such a way that an alternative path must be used.

Cats having long fur a lot of times develop more hairballs than other cats. If a cat cannot rid itself of cat hairballs through vomiting or through the digestive system, it might suffer from a blockage in the intestine or stomach. Left untreated for too long, it can be life-threatening. Without surgery, that blockage caused by a hairball might be deadly.

Although cats and hairballs are a common sight, one must pay attention in order to avoid complications.
Hairballs, while hard to avoid, are fairly easy to deal with. Brushing your cat and helping with its grooming lowers the chance of it swallowing a lot of hair. Brush strokes help get rid of a lot of that dead, loose hair. The diet of your cat could be helpful in eliminating hairballs from its system. Some manufacturers produce cat food containing special oils , like mineral oil, that help break up the hairballs, allowing for easier digestion. Shedding hair is also minimized because the oils help strengthen it.

Special treats for your cats containing petroleum products may also help fighting cat hairballs. These petroleum-based treats help coat the tummy and digestive system for smooth passage through the body. There are several possibilities to administer these petroleum-based treats. Some cats may be fed simply by spoon. With others, try putting some food on their snout and see if they will lick it off. If these methods fail, put some on their paws and watch them lick the treats off that way. If you follow this advice you will encounter the cats and hairballs phenomenon less and less.

When a blockage caused by cat hairballs will happen is impossible to predict, yet once it happens you must look for complication symptoms. If the cat coughs for 24 hours with no relief, if it lacks appetite, and can not release his bowel movements you must act immediately. Take it to a vet for surgery, because this may be the only way to remove the blockage. Keep a close eye on your cat and take preventive measures.

If You Read One Article About Organizations, Read This One

Necessity for the Humane Treatment of Animals

Throughout the last several years, comprehension of animals has considerably evolved. Terrible, nightmarish actions were done on animals, all in the name of science. Lots of folks believed the creatures they tortured really didn’t have any emotions or feelings what-so-ever. The horrid tests they performed on these laboratory creatures were beyond comprehension. The scientists working on the creatures thought the screams and desperate attempt to free themselves was all part of a built-in reaction, void of pain or fear.

Thank goodness we now understand this to not be completely true. Creatures can feel pain, just as individuals. Studies have demonstrated, beyond a doubt, that animals truly experience stress when placed in less than comfortable circumstances. When ‘feed’ animals are kept in the exact same room as the animals being butchered, their vital signs drastically quicken, as well as portraying nervous inclinations. Unfortunately, in addition they spread emotions for the creatures being harmed or killed.

The cruelty we inflict on animals that are caged cannot be tolerated any longer. Living conditions and the habitats of these animals are abominable even though we know they significantly suffer. A well known fast food chicken eatery keeps their chickens cuts off their beaks, stacked on top of one another, feeds them steroids and antibiotics, just to name of few of the inhumane acts. Not only do they not care that we understand these matters, they’re smug in their own response to go eat someplace else if it disturbs you.

We must be proactive, and demand more humane treatment of the less fortunate creatures who are born into, or adopted into food houses or such research labs. Like Wayne Pacelle, the CEO of Humane Society of the United States, we need to advocate for their rights and freedom. Because they will probably be slaughtered, it doesn’t grant the folks who are housing the animals the right to mistreat them. It’s bad enough they’re there for the reason they’re. In addition, we should require they are put down in the most compassionate manner possible.

Ask a veterinarian you may know of on creature’s aches, pains and emotions are. You might be shocked to find many veterinarians tend not to even spread pain medicine after operation; particularly routine operations, including neutering, spade and cutting the horns off bulls among other things. The more conventional veterinarians will actually laugh in the face of a ‘newer age’ veterinarian who puts the creature’s pain and comfort level under consideration.

If anyone has compassion about an animal’s comfort level, it’d definitely be a veterinarian. Many of the schools educate them to put up a wall to protect themselves from becoming too attached. They do the same thing in medical and nursing school; they make an effort to educate you to be detached from your patient, so the affectionate inclinations which generally helped you determine to go into this preferred profession are rapidly hidden and covered with all the technical facets of the business.

Individuals need to begin insisting that their pets and farm animals’ vets bring back compassion to the forefront of their chosen profession. It is not too much to ask for humane treatment of animals.

Toxicity study on primates of quantum dots is good news fornanomedicine – China train wash systems

Medical uses for quantum dots – tiny luminescent crystals – couldinclude image-guided surgery, light-activated therapies andsensitive diagnostic tests. A pioneering study to gauge the toxicity of quantum dots inprimates has found the tiny crystals to be safe over a one-yearperiod, a hopeful outcome for doctors and scientists seeking newways to battle diseases like cancer through nanomedicine. The research, which appears in Nature Nanotechnology online, is likely the first to test the safety of quantum dots inprimates. In the study, scientists found that four rhesus monkeys injectedwith cadmium-selenide quantum dots remained in normal health over90 days.

Blood and biochemical markers stayed in typical ranges,and major organs developed no abnormalities. The animals didn’tlose weight. Two monkeys observed for an additional year also showed no signs ofillness. Quantum dots are tiny luminescent crystals that glow brightly indifferent colors. Medical researchers are eyeing the crystals foruse in image-guided surgery, light-activated therapies andsensitive diagnostic tests. s.

Cadmium selenide quantum dots are amongthe most studied, with potential applications not only in medicine,but as components of solar cells, quantum computers, light-emittingdiodes and more. The new toxicity study – completed by the University at Buffalo,the Chinese PLA General Hospital, China’s ChangChun University ofScience and Technology, and Singapore’s Nanyang TechnologicalUniversity – begins to address the concern of health professionalswho worry that quantum dots may be dangerous to humans. The authors caution, however, that more research is needed todetermine the nanocrystals’ long-term effects in primates; most ofthe potentially toxic cadmium from the quantum dots stayed in theliver, spleen and kidneys of the animals studied over the 90-dayperiod. “This is the first study that uses primates as animal models for invivo studies with quantum dots,” said paper coauthor Paras Prasad,UB professor of chemistry and medicine, and executive director ofUB’s Institute for Lasers, Photonics and Biophotonics (ILPB).

“Sofar, such toxicity studies have focused only on mice and rats, buthumans are very different from mice. More studies using animalmodels that are closer to humans are necessary.” The cadmium build-up, in particular, is a serious concern thatwarrants further investigation, said Ken-Tye Yong, a NanyangTechnological University assistant professor who began working withPrasad on the study as a postdoctoral researcher at UB. Because of that concern, the best in-vivo applications forcadmium-selenide quantum dots in medicine may be the ones that usethe crystals in a limited capacity, said Mark Swihart, a thirdcoauthor and a UB professor of chemical and biological engineering.Image-guided surgery, which could involve a single dose of quantumdots to identify a tumor or other target area, falls into thiscategory. Additional References Citations.

The e-commerce company in China offers quality products such as China train wash systems , car wash systems Manufacturer, and more. For more , please visit car wash systems today!

Are Pillow Pets Good For Infants

Lots of people have enjoyed the Pillow Pets since they were released in 2003. These charming pillows for children, that at the time of the two thousand and nine Christmas season, when they were being sold out all over, several people were forking out more than one hundred dollars for them so their child could have their Christmas wish of owning one.

But wait, with so many pet pillows being unloaded you probably will need to ask yourself how risk free are they and should toddlers be allowed to have them? These are questions that I asked myself. I dont have any young kids to actually buy them for, but I do want to honestly recommend them to pals and family that do have toddlers. I myself find them extremely cuddly. So I did some exploration to see if they were safe.

Findings Of My Research

In my analysis of the Pillow Pets I discovered that there were zero small materials, which could possibly be eaten by children who seem to just delight in putting stuff in their mouths. And speaking of putting things in their mouths, these plush animal pillows for kids are made of soft chenille and have no compounds that may be dangerous to toddlers.

If youre going to purchase for a infant and youre worried there is a threat of the infant being smothered while using the large size, you can still just get the smaller size.

To Conclude

I think that these pillows for kids are safe for kids of any age and that includes infants. As with other things there is always a bit of danger, but thats just part of life. In testimonials I have found, kids and parents both genuinely adore those Pillow Pets and are positively delighted that they chosen them.

Birds And Their Symbiotic Relationships With Animals

Throughout history, certain species of birds have formed strategic partnerships with other animals. And these partnerships have seeming served both of them well. Here are just a few of those pairings.

One of these strange relationships is the one that wild pigs have with robins in Europe. Wild pigs are known for their digging ability. So much so, that many people refer to them as digging machines. And what they are digging for is root foods which they live on. They also feed on grubs and small worms that they find in the soil.

Over the years, the robin has noticed that whenever these wild pigs appear and start to dig up the ground, they are also digging up and exposing worms. As a result, robins have learned to stay close to these pigs as they begin to dig so they can scoop up the worms that appear on the surface.

In a like manner, the Nightjar has an interesting symbiotic relationship with wild cattle and goats in areas where the both live. For the most part, nightjars are birds of the night. Their primary diet consists of moths and beetles. The bird is a great aerial hunter and, even in mid flight, is capable of deftly snatching moths from the air. However, when it is on the ground, it is typically hunting ants and beetles.

During the passing of many hundreds of years, the nightjar has come to notice that when wild cattle and goats are grazing nearby, that their continuous moving around agitates the ground on which they are grazing. And as they do this, all of the activity causes insects to come above ground. So insects such as beetles and moths, are all of a sudden on the surface making them easy pickings for predators. As a result, the nightjar has learned that its often easier to follow the herds and feed off of the insects that they dig up than it is to hunt and scrounge for their own meals.

The oxpecker bird is yet another illustration of birds forming symbiotic relationships. The oxpecker is a close relation to the starling. And within Africa, this bird has a real working partnership with many animals – antelope, buffalo, rhinoceros, and even the giraffe. The relationship has to do with the fact that ticks and lice are very common in this environment.

They are a nuisance to these large animals because their eggs hatch on the animal’s surface and immediately becomes a parasite by gorging on their blood. If an animal gets enough of these on its skin, it can find its strength and staminal slowly being drained away.

Oxpeckers love these parasites because they contain lots of blood which has a ton of nourishments. They comb through the skin and hairs of these large animals and consume all of the ticks and lice that they find. A win/win for everyone.

Isn’t Live Animal Research Livlier

In 2008 European researchers demonstrated that when cows and deer are resting or grazing, they face magnetic north or south. Before that the only mammals known to have magnetic-compass orientation were a few species of bats and rodents. Now researchers have discovered that when cows and deer are near power lines, they position themselves randomly. Power lines locally change the earth’s magnetic field. That cows and deer return to their usual north-south alignment away from power lines is taken as further evidence that they sense and respond to magnetic fields. Why this happens is the next field-test.

According to a study done by researchers at UCLA’s Center for Sleep Research, walruses are the only animals that don’t sleep daily. In fact, they can stay active for up to 84 hours without showing behavioral signs of sleep. When they’re in the water, they sleep floating on the surface, lying on the bottom or standing while leaning against something. They’ve even been seen sleeping resting in water while using their tusks to hang from ice floes. When walruses sleep under water, they can hold their breath 4 to 5 minutes. When they sleep on land, they land up to 19 hours of sleep.

According to research, avian adultery isn’t uncommon. Two ornithologists from Oxford University studied the songs of the Peruvian warbling antbird, found mostly in the western Amazon basin. An antbird couple will sing a harmonious duet when confronted by a rival pair of antbirds. However, if a single female approaches, she increases the likelihood the “husband” will cheat on or leave his mate for the new female. To prevent this, the antbird “wife” jams her mate’s song. She interrupts his music with her own music. It seems the wife antbird has a bird’s-eye view of her husband’s wandering eye.

Researchers have studied Santino, a 31-year-old chimpanzee in a Swedish zoo. Before the zoo opened each day, Santino would calmly collect rocks. He would also bang pieces loose from concrete boulders and break them into smaller pieces. In the afternoon Santino would aggressively throw these weapons at zoo visitors. Seeming comfortable in his position as leader, he didn’t throw things at other chimpanzees. To the researchers this human-like behavior demonstrated that Santino was capable of planning ahead and carrying out his plan. Thankfully, because of bad aim, no one was seriously hurt – but Santino didn’t aim to be in a zoo.

Pixie-bob Cats Nature’s Wild Blending

In man’s quest to create a domestic wild cat, sometimes Mother Nature takes a hand and does the job beautifully with no help from man at all. In the northern regions of the United States where Bobcats roam and farmers own domestic cats to keep the onset of field mice to a roar, there are kittens born every spring that are the resulting litters of Bobcats mating with domestic cats.

Carol Ann Brewer founded the first Pixie-Bob in the early 1980’s in Washington State, when a small Coastal Red Bobcat was seen fighting with a short-tailed polydactyl barn cat. In case you didn’t know it, a polydactyl cat is a six-toed cat often referred to as a Hemingway cat. Then when enough time had passed, this barn cat gave birth to a litter of kittens that looked suspiciously like they were part Bobcat. Intrigued with the appearance and behavior of these kittens, Brewer purchased a male and began her research to see if this type of blending would require any kind of special treatment. What she discovered was that other people had documented similar breeds in the Pacific Northwest and that it really wasn’t all that unusual an occurrence, but the result of natural mating between a domestic and a wild cat.

She then acquired a female cat with the same auspicious parenting and used the two to develop her own breeding program. The kittens of this union created a female, which she named Pixie and had the same wild look of the Bobcat with a reddish-fawn coat. Pixie not only became the grand dam for most of the female line in the program but the breed took her namesake and became known as the Pixie-Bob.

There are two types of Pixie-Bob cats, a straight foot, having the typical cat paw with five toes in front and four in back, and the polydactyl, which has six toes. It is the polydactyl that is the dominant trait and the only breed accepted as show cats. Six-toed cats are absolutely adorable. Their paws often resemble little mittens on the kittens and catchers’ mitts on the adult cats. They actually appear to have opposable thumbs and sometimes can be seen scooping up food or toys with these beautiful paws, which they then toss or throw across the room so that they can go chase it.

Male Pixie-Bobs can vary in weight from twelve to a whopping twenty-six pounds, with the females running slightly smaller, and both genders have either short, wooly “stand out” coats or the longer, medium-length silky ones. Naturally, they all have a bobbed tail that runs from two to six inches in length. Many also have Lynx tufting on their ear tips. Intelligent and loyal, Pixie-Bobs make affectionate companions and house pets and exhibit an almost doglike devotion to their owners.